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Deviled Eggs with Bacon

Deviled Eggs with Bacon



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Bring a medium-sized pot of water to a boil. When the water is at a full boil, carefully add the eggs. Set a timer for 18 minutes.

While the eggs are boiling, cut the bacon into a small dice and cook on low heat in a sauté pan with a little bit of cooking oil. Stir occasionally while cooking. When they are crispy, pour the entire contents of the pan into a strainer and reserve the bacon fat, place the crispy bacon on a paper towel-lined plate.

When the eggs are done, remove them from the boiling water and place them in an ice bath, or run cold water over them until they are cool. Peel the eggs and cut them in half, put the yolks in a bowl and save the whites.

Chop 4 of the egg white halves and add them to the yolks. Crush the yolk and egg white mixture with a fork and add the mustard, mayonnaise, shallot, chives, and pickle juice. Mix well and add salt and pepper to taste.

Spoon the filling into the reserved egg whites. Top with a spoonful of bacon fat and some crispy bacon and serve.


Preparation

Step 1

Place eggs in a large saucepan add water to cover by 1". Bring to a boil, cover, and remove from heat. Let sit for 10 minutes. Drain. Transfer eggs to a bowl of ice water and let cool completely, about 10 minutes peel. Halve lengthwise and remove yolks.

Step 2

Coarsely chop bacon. Cook in a medium skillet over medium heat until browned and crisp. Transfer bacon to paper towels. Strain drippings through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl. Add melted butter if needed to measure 2 Tbsp.

Step 3

Finely mash reserved yolks, bacon fat (and/or butter), mayonnaise, mustard, and chopped scallions in a medium bowl season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Step 4

Transfer to a large resealable freezer bag, then cut 1/2" off 1 corner. Pipe into whites garnish with thinly sliced scallions and reserved bacon.

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Bacon Deviled Eggs

To me, a good deviled egg is one with a well-seasoned, firm filling&mdashand lots of thick-cut bacon. There&rsquos so much bacon goodness here that you won&rsquot be able to pipe the filling into these eggs the piping bag would immediately clog up! Instead, use a small teaspoon and carefully mound the filling inside each egg white half. Steaming the eggs in a steamer basket set over a saucepan of boiling water might seem unusual but it really works. Steamed eggs are much easier to peel and the method helps prevent overcooking (and that unappealing green ring around the yolk). A touch of Dijon mustard and pinch of cayenne pepper add a spicy note that works well in the oh-so-rich filling. And small banana pepper rings and/or thinly sliced pickled okra make a cute topper for the eggs and also add a welcome hit of acidity and heat that balances out all that savory, smoky bacon. Go ahead and make a second batch&mdashthey&rsquore so easy to make and tend to disappear quickly. I promise your crowd will go wild for them.


How to Make the Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs for Bacon Deviled Eggs

The secret to the best deviled eggs is making sure you hard-boil them correctly. When the steam vapor penetrates the shell, the outer membrane of the egg separates from the shell, making it
infinitely easier to peel.

Place the eggs in a pot with cold water. There should be an inch or two of water above the eggs. Salt generously. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Cook for 12 to 14 minutes. If you're cooking a lot of eggs, it may take a few minutes extra. Remove the eggs from the hot water, then run them under cold water or place them in an ice bath.


  1. Bring a pot or large saucepan of water to a full boil.
  2. Carefully lower the eggs into the water and cook for 8 minutes.
  3. Drain and immediately place in a bowl of ice water. When the eggs have cooled, peel them while still in the water (the water helps the shell slide off).
  4. Cut the eggs in half and scoop out the yolks.
  5. Combine the yolks with the mayo, mustard, chipotle, and a good pinch of salt and pepper.
  6. Stir to combine thoroughly.
  7. Scoop the mixture into a sealable plastic bag, pushing it all the way into one corner.
  8. Cut a small hole in the corner.
  9. Squeeze to pipe the yolk mixture back into the whites.
  10. Top each with a sprinkle of paprika and a bit of crumbled bacon.

This recipe (and hundreds more!) came from one of our Cook This, Not That! books. For more easy cooking ideas, you can also buy the book!


The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Separate the egg whites from the yolks. Place the yolks in a mixing bowl and place the whites on a serving tray.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

To the bowl add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, salt, and red pepper.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Stir to combine until smooth. (Make sure there aren't any large chunks of egg yolk or it will clog the piping bag when filling the egg whites.)

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Place the egg yolk mixture in a piping bag fitted with a large star tip. Pipe the filling into the cavity of each egg white. Alternately, the halves can also be filled using a small spoon.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Sprinkle with the crumbled bacon.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Top with the minced chives.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Deviled eggs can be served on a deviled egg platter with wells to hold each half. Alternately, the halves can be placed on a platter in a bed of alfalfa sprouts. This not only offers beautiful presentation, but also keeps the deviled eggs from sliding around the platter when passed at a party.

The Spruce / Kristina Vanni

Deviled eggs are delicious all on their own as a snack or appetizer. However, they're also great alongside a big, leafy salad (or tossed in with one), and other spring vegetables such as asparagus.

What Is the Best Way to Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs??

To peel the egg, lightly tap it on a hard surface to crack the shell. Once the shell is cracked all the way around, it should easily peel away from the egg. Sometimes if an egg is older (i.e., not from the farmers market), it will be easier to peel. After the shell is removed, briefly rinse the egg under water to remove any small bits of shell that may still be attached.

It's thought that older eggs are easier to peel than ones straight from the farmers' market, but that can vary widely. Regardless of the age of your eggs, your best bet is to make sure you plunge them in an ice bath to cool afterward, which helps prevent the egg whites from sticking to the shell.

How to Store Deviled Eggs

Deviled eggs are best the day they are made, but can be kept in the refrigerator, covered, for up to 2 days.


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These are the BEST Low-Carb Bacon Deviled Eggs

Place all the yolks in a medium bowl and mash well with a potato masher or a fork. Then add mayonnaise, mustard, relish, stevia, sea salt, and black pepper. Mix well. Add two thirds of the bacon, reserving the rest for garnish. Mix until evenly combined.

Using a ziplock bag with a snipped corner or a specialty piping bag, fill each hollow egg white with the yolk mixture. Top with remaining bacon and fresh chives. Dust with paprika. Refrigerate the eggs for at least 1 hour before serving. Enjoy!

Nutrition Information

Yield: 4 servings, Serving Size: 3 deviled egg halves
Amount Per Serving: 224 Calories | 17g Fat | 1g Total Carbs | 0g Fiber | 13g Protein | 1g Net Carbs

These deviled eggs are heavenly!

And while that may be an oxymoron&hellip it&rsquos the truth! 🤣 These low-carb deviled eggs with bacon are SO GOOD, you&rsquoll have a newfound respect for the dear old egg. What&rsquos more, these deviled eggs are super easy and fun to whip up.

Want a little potluck praise? Whether or not the crowd is keto, this is THE DISH to bring&mdashalthough, you may get tired of people asking for the recipe!

    • Try our favorite cooking method for achieving perfect hardboiled eggs. I always check one egg before draining and cooling to be sure they&rsquove reached the desired doneness.
      • Another great cooking option is the Dash Deluxe Rapid Egg Cooker&hellip Check out our stellar review!
        • Did you know that older eggs peel much easier than fresh eggs? Yep, it&rsquos true. So if you know you&rsquore planning to prepare deviled eggs in the near future, buy them a week or two ahead of time. Just stick them in the back of your fridge and leave them to age.
          • To make especially pretty deviled eggs, use a piping bag with decorative tips. Just be sure the tip you choose is large enough to push the bacon bits through. Also, use an empty cup or jar to hold your plastic bag up. Fold the edges of the plastic bag over the cup and easily fill it with contents!
            • For potlucks & BBQs, a deviled egg storage container really comes in handy! I also really love pretty serving dishes, like this porcelain one from Amazon.
              • Make sure you cool the eggs for at least 1 hour before eating&mdashthe flavor is much better!

              Even the kids love these low-carb bacon deviled eggs!

              I don&rsquot know about you, but I have some picky eaters on my hands. Luckily, this deviled egg recipe scores a 10 from every member of my family. The kiddos really enjoy piping the filling into the egg halves. And while the eggs may not look as pretty as they could, the proud smiles worn by my four- and six-year-old are worth the aesthetic sacrifice. 😄


              Bacon Deviled Eggs

              Place eggs in a large saucepan add water to cover by 1". Bring to a boil, cover, and remove from heat. Let sit for 10 minutes. Drain. Transfer eggs to a bowl of ice water and let cool completely, about 10 minutes peel. Halve lengthwise and remove yolks.

              Step 2

              Coarsely chop bacon. Cook in a medium skillet over medium heat until browned and crisp. Transfer bacon to paper towels. Strain drippings through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl. Add melted butter if needed to measure 2 Tbsp.

              Step 3

              Finely mash reserved yolks, bacon fat (and/or butter), mayonnaise, mustard, and chopped scallions in a medium bowl season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

              Step 4

              Transfer to a large resealable freezer bag, then cut 1/2" off 1 corner.

              Step 5

              Pipe into whites garnish with thinly sliced scallions and reserved bacon.


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              The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast.