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Perfect roasties recipe

Perfect roasties recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Vegetable
  • Root vegetables
  • Potato
  • Potato side dishes
  • Roast potatoes

I always try to use Golden Wonders or large baking potatoes - waxy or new potatoes don't crisp up as much. This recipe involves par-boiling them first before roasting, so they all cook evenly and are fluffy on the inside and crispy on the outside.


County Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK

57 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 16 roasties

  • 4 large potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, or as needed
  • 1 pinch sea salt

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:1hr ›Ready in:1hr10min

  1. Preheat the oven to 190 degrees C / gas mark 5. Warm a roasting tin or oven-proof casserole dish while you are preparing the potatoes.
  2. Place peeled potatoes in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes; drain really well in a colander, shaking them for a few seconds to fluff them up at the edges.
  3. Carefully arrange the potatoes in the roasting tin and baste them with hot oil. Sprinkle over some sea salt and roast for an hour, turning them every 20 minutes or so, until they've crisped up and are golden all over.

Tip

Don't be tempted to peel the potatoes and leave them soaking in water - this will cause them to be soggy inside when you roast them. If you need to get ahead, you can roast them the day before and reheat.

Tip

Make sure the potatoes are really dry after par-boiling them for 10 minutes. This will prevent them from sticking to the tin as they roast.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(6)

Reviews in English (5)

Delicious...I like to think my roasties now rival my dad's in terms of deliciousness!-10 Aug 2013

Amazing roasties, tasted perfect! Crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside.. perfect for Sunday dinner!-26 Mar 2018

Until yesterday, I had never heard of "Roasties". (A fault of being hidden deep in the USA.) I did learn they are a UK recipe so I jumped across the pond to get a recipe. I am very happy that this is the one I chose for the first try. The roasties turned out crispy and golden outside, yet fluffy and moist inside. I will not pursue any other recipe for roasties. Thank you, Ita!-18 Mar 2017


How to cook the perfect rösti

F or a simple peasant dish with just two ingredients – and humble ones at that – rösti is surprisingly difficult to pin down. In fact, it's almost as if the Swiss want to keep the recipe secret, tucked away in a subterranean vault, as establishing anything concrete about this Alpine favourite, from the type of potatoes used to the cooking method, is a feat akin to scaling the north face of the Eiger. (In fact, it's even harder, because no one, as far as I can tell, has come up with anything even vaguely resembling a definitive rösti recipe.) The only thing I do work out during my initial research is that I've been pronouncing it wrongly all these years: apparently it's reursch-ti rather than row-sti. But frankly, that's the least of my troubles.

While many Swiss consider it their national dish, the world has taken a shine to it too, and it's not as if I haven't eaten a few in my time (most memorably one in the Himalayas that came with a teaspoon embedded in the centre). That said, I was startled to read on one food blog that despite a year-round average humidity of 84% "most restaurants . in Singapore serve rösti as a side". A taste for fried potato, it seems, is universal. All too often, however, these globalised röstis have an unpleasantly starchy flavour and greasy, raw interior, which makes them a prospect even less appealing than burger bar hash browns as far as I'm concerned.

Then, this summer, I spent a long weekend walking in the Alps, and I realised that, while the Swiss are apparently incapable of producing even a glass of water for less than a tenner, they do make the world's best rösti. Crisp on the outside, soft and meltingly, well, potato-ey within, it was so good it needed no other adornment – although, of course, with mountains to climb, I added liberal amounts of smoked ham and local cheese. But, when I tried to find a recipe to recreate it at home, I came up against a wall of silence: and with no definitive way to cook a rösti, the only thing to do was experiment.


Perfect English Roast Potatoes

This style of roasting potatoes, commonplace in the U.K., creates roast potatoes that are fluffy inside and exceedingly crunchy outside, thanks to a shallow fry in hot oil while in the oven. They’re best eaten hot out of the oven, and this recipe makes enough for 4 people. But if you don’t have that many mouths to feed, chill any leftovers in the fridge for up to 3 days. Rewarm them in a 350-degree oven or re-crisp them in a skillet the next morning and top with a fried egg.

Peel the potatoes, then cut them into rough 1 ½-inch chunks. Place the potatoes in a large saucepan and cover by at least 2 inches with cold water. Season the water liberally with salt, then place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil, which should take about 15 minutes or so.

Meanwhile, pour the oil into a large roasting pan and set the roasting pan in a cold oven. Heat the oven to 500 degrees (or as high as it goes) so the pan and oil can get blazingly hot while the potatoes come to a boil.

Once the water starts boiling, continue cooking the potatoes, stirring occasionally, until half-cooked — you should be able to pierce the largest pieces halfway through to their middles with a paring knife — 3 to 5 minutes.

Drain the potatoes in a colander in the sink, then transfer them back to the pot. Clamp on the lid and, with mitts or folded kitchen towels on your hands for protection, give the whole pot a few shakes to rough up the potatoes.

Using caution, open the oven, pull the hot roasting pan full of oil out of the oven, then carefully topple the potatoes into the hot oil. Give the potatoes a stir to disperse them evenly, then return the pan to the oven and let the potatoes roast for 20 minutes. Flip the potatoes to evenly brown the outsides, and roast until deep golden brown and intensely crunchy, 20 to 30 minutes more.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the potatoes out of the oil and onto paper towels to drain. Season with salt while hot and serve immediately.

Ben Mims is the cooking columnist for the Los Angeles Times. He has written three cookbooks and has worked as a food editor and recipe developer for several food media publications, such as Lucky Peach, Food & Wine, Saveur, Food Network and Buzzfeed/Tasty.

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Ingredients for Roast Potatoes

The detailed ingredient list and directions are in the printable recipe card at the bottom of this post.

Potatoes- You can use Russet potatoes, Yukon gold, King Edward, Maris piper, or others. Check notes below for details on the best to use.

Olive oil- You can substitute for duck fat. You can also use other types of oil like canola oil, vegetable, or sunflower oil.

Flour - Plain flour (All purpose) or self-raising flour. Use whichever you have available.

Semolina flour or cornflour - Optional. For crunchiness.

Paprika- Optional

Black pepper - Optional

What are the best potatoes for roasting

Floury potatoes are the best for roasting. In the UK, King Edwards potatoes and Maris piper are my favorites.

In the US, Russet potatoes or Yukon gold are the top choices. Russet are crisper than Yukon gold.

In Australia, the best varieties for roasting are Dutch cream, Coliban, or Desiree.

Whichever part of the world you are, you can achieve this dish. Because of the level of starch, the crispness of your potatoes may vary but they will still be crisp, flavorful and an excellent side dish to grace your table and celebration meal.

Should I boil potatoes before roasting?

Yes, this recipe parboils the potatoes first. By boiling, it reduces the roasting time and ensures the inside of the potato is soft and fluffy while the outside is crisp.


Potato Roasties

This recipe for English-style roasted potatoes has the best of both worlds — a potato with dreamlike, fluffy insides and rough, crispy skins. A juicy red wine is the only serving accompaniment you’ll need. In the unlikely event you have leftovers, the potatoes are just as good the next morning from the fridge.

Servings:

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Ingredients
Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees with the rack in the middle. Add the oil to a rimmed sheet pan (13-by-18-inches) and place it in the oven.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the potatoes and boil until softened, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain the potatoes in a colander and sprinkle with the flour. Shake the colander to distribute the flour evenly.

Carefully remove the pan with the hot oil from the oven. Spread the potatoes out in a single layer in the hot pan. The potatoes should sizzle upon making contact with the hot oil. Return the baking sheet to the oven and roast the potatoes for about 1 hour, until golden brown. Every 15 to 20 minutes, flip the potato pieces, ensuring that all sides brown evenly. About 45 minutes into cooking, sprinkle the potatoes with the rosemary and/or the garlic, if using. Transfer to a cooling rack and generously season with the salt and serve.


Perfect Roast Potatoes

Let me break it to you, Christmas dinner or Thanksgiving dinner without some good, crunchy and fluffy roast potatoes is nothing but a meeting. OK! Just kidding but really? Your roast dinner gathering is not complete without this potato side dish.

Whenever I really want to impress my family especially my daughter who is not so much of a roasties fan, I make this crunchy and fluffy delicious roasties. She has never said no to it (touchwood it would remain so). These perfect roast potatoes are a great accompaniment to your roast chicken dinner. It is a great crowd pleaser and you would be surprised how you can make these amazing roast potatoes with just 4 ingredients.


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Croeso! I'm Karen it’s lovely to see you here. I was born in South Africa, but I've lived all over the world, latterly calling North Yorkshire my home where I lived for many years before moving to SW France, although I'm now living in North Wales in an old converted Schoolhouse on the edge of Snowdonia National Park. I am a freelance food and travel writer, as well as a food stylist, and recipe developer, with a passion for art, travel, books, photography, seasonal food and especially cheese and wine. Please do get in contact with me if you have any questions about my work or commissioning me. Read More…

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Perfect Roast Potatoes

Needs must and all that, so I have always been an open anti-perfectionist, but in truth (and I’m sorry to repeat what I’ve said before) it is impossible to cook roast potatoes without needing them to be perfect, which to me means sweet and soft inside and a golden-brown carapace of crunch without. And, strangely, no matter how many tricksy things you may succeed at in cooking, no matter what techniques you may master, nothing gives quite the contented glow of achievement that cooking a good tray of roast potatoes does.

There are three crucial things that I think make the difference: the first is the heat of the fat – if it’s not searingly hot, you don’t stand a chance, and since goose fat has a very high smoking point and tastes good, it is my annual choice here the second is the size of your potatoes – you want them relatively small, so that the ratio of crunchy outside to fluffy interior is optimized and, finally, I think dredging the potatoes – and this is a family practice, inherited through the maternal line – in semolina rather than flour after parboiling, then really rattling the pan around to make the potatoes a bit mashed on the surface so they catch more in the hot fat, is a major aid.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

Needs must and all that, so I have always been an open anti-perfectionist, but in truth (and I’m sorry to repeat what I’ve said before) it is impossible to cook roast potatoes without needing them to be perfect, which to me means sweet and soft inside and a golden-brown carapace of crunch without. And, strangely, no matter how many tricksy things you may succeed at in cooking, no matter what techniques you may master, nothing gives quite the contented glow of achievement that cooking a good tray of roast potatoes does.

There are three crucial things that I think make the difference: the first is the heat of the fat – if it’s not searingly hot, you don’t stand a chance, and since goose fat has a very high smoking point and tastes good, it is my annual choice here the second is the size of your potatoes – you want them relatively small, so that the ratio of crunchy outside to fluffy interior is optimized and, finally, I think dredging the potatoes – and this is a family practice, inherited through the maternal line – in semolina rather than flour after parboiling, then really rattling the pan around to make the potatoes a bit mashed on the surface so they catch more in the hot fat, is a major aid.


THE KEY TO PERFECT ROAST POTATOES

Firstly, choose the best variety of spud. Go for a floury, high-starch variety such as King Edward or Maris Piper, as these will give you really light and fluffy centres. Our next tip is to get your fat nice and hot before the potatoes go into the tray, as this will help the edges crisp up for that all-important ‘crunch’ when you bite into them.

As much as possible, keep your potatoes in a single layer in the roasting tray – even if this means roasting a second batch – as they won’t crisp up if they’re layered on top of each other. Lastly, take time to ‘chuff’ your parboiled potatoes by tossing them in a colander to roughen the edges. This will allow more fat to crisp up around the surface of your spud. Take this idea a step further by taking your spuds out of the oven 10 minutes early and slightly flattening them, before putting back in the oven to finish – this expands their surface area, for even more of a crunch!


Crispy Potato Roast Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Bertoli Rich Taste Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1.5 L
  • 4 pounds russet potatoes, peeled
  • 4 shallots, thickly sliced lengthwise
  • Coarse salt
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon red-pepper flakes (optional)
  • 8 sprigs thyme
  • full instructions Martha Stewart

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