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Chili’s To Roll Out Delivery

Chili’s To Roll Out Delivery



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450 locations will begin delivering by the end of November

Chili's has expanded from having a dining and take out to soon having delivery.

No need to head over to Chili’s for dinner any more, because by the end of November, 450 Chili’s throughout the country will begin delivering, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Wyman Roberts, parent company Brinker’s chief executive and president, first had the idea when he saw the positive reaction to delivery from the customers at Maggiano’s, which they also own.

“We’re not buying vehicles,” Roberts told NRN, “We’re leveraging assets that we already have… It doesn’t take a whole lot of incremental sales to make this a nice-returning piece of business for us.” So it looks like delivery drivers will be using their own cars.

Roberts predicts that the most popular times for delivery is when people are off of work or looking to grab a bite to eat, such as lunch.

Chili’s isn’t afraid of change. Also reported by Nation’s Restaurant News, this past September, Chili’s “rolled out tabletop tablets”, which allows customers to order food without a waiter or waitress. They’ve also added new menu items, such as their flatbreads and pizzas, and apparently don’t plan on stopping there.


McDonald’s partners with BTS for chicken nugget meal with South Korean-inspired flavors

McDonald’s has something “Dynamite” lined up for the spring.

The fast-food giant has partnered with K-pop group BTS.

On Monday, Micky Dees announced its latest celebrity meal will be inspired by the seven-member, platinum-selling music act that has taken the world by storm with their slick fashion aesthetic, R&B-styled dance moves and positive messages.

Rolling out in the United States on May 26, the BTS meal will consist of a 10-piece order of chicken nuggets, medium fries, a medium Coke, and new sweet chili and cajun dipping sauces inspired by recipes from McDonald’s South Korea locations.

The signature menu item will debut in the U.S. and 11 other countries, before rolling out in other places around the world.

With scheduled releases in 49 countries, this marks the first celebrity meal launch of such global scale for the Chicago-headquartered burger chain.


The Mostly Vegan

Spring rolls, summer rolls, Vietnamese spring rolls. Whatever you call them, these veggie packed bundles make the perfect vehicle delivery system for packing an insane amount of veggies into your diet. Weirdly – and stupidly – I only started making veggie spring rolls at home about a month ago. I think I was always a bit intimidated by the whole process, but that’s all in the past.


Once you get the hang of rolling up the rice paper, homemade spring rolls are ridiculously easy to master. Ok, I’m using the term master very loosely, but rice paper is totally forgiving. I tend to overstuff mine, which means a lot of nipping and tucking the ends of my rolls to seal them up in a cute little package. They might not look awe inspiring fully formed, but once you cut them in half, no one will care. All those glorious colorful veggies peeking out will shut down any haters. My preferred stuffing lineup? Cold maifun rice noodles (sometimes I use brown rice noodles for even more fiber), purple cabbage, red bell pepper, cucumber, bean sprouts, and carrots. All layered on top of a leaf of romaine lettuce.


Now that I’m a homemade spring roll making convert, I’ve been making these non-stop. I even had my mom over for a spring roll making party (oh ya, we party hard) on a Monday night. About one hour and one bottle of wine later, she’d made enough spring rolls to pack for lunches for the rest of the week and I’d made a bunch for my husband and I to enjoy on a flight to Nashville the next day. Did I mention that these last for days in the fridge and make the perfect travel food? Word of warning though, if you’re going to pack in a carry-on, be sure to put the dipping sauce in a container clearly marked with TSA approved ounces. Shout out to the security agent at LAX who let my spicy peanut sauce go through with a warning!

Which brings me to the spicy peanut dipping sauce! Natural peanut butter is the base, which provides protein and some healthy fat (because man cannot live on veggies alone), while rice vinegar adds tang, maple syrup a hit of natural sweetness, chili garlic sauce a bit of heat, and coconut aminos lend an umami-esque savory finish. I love me some coconut aminos, which I sub out for the more traditional soy sauce, because soy tends to upset my stomach and frankly, I just don’t like the taste. The coconut aminos also keep this dish completely gluten free.


Now, are you ready to get your spring roll on? Keep in mind, the recipe as written below makes 15 – 20 spring rolls and about a cup and a half of sauce. It’s a lot, but they’ll last in the fridge for up to 5 days. The recipe can easily be halved to make less. I tend to eat about 3 – 4 rolls (uncut) with a 1/3 cup dipping sauce before I start to feel like I’m turning into a vegetable, but you do you.


Pork Green Chili (Colorado Style)

This is a classic Colorado-style green chili – plenty of green chiles, tomatoes, some tomatillos, and thickened with flour. This one has a really nice, well-rounded flavor. Want a good green chili for smothering burritos and eggs? With its shredded pork and thick consistency, this one’s a great choice.

I made this medium-hot – it’s got enough kick to make most Coloradans happy, but some will want it hotter. Just add another serrano or two to blow their socks off.

This does use a lot of flour for thickening (which is also why it works so well as a sauce) – so Paleo it ain’t.

  • 2 lbs pork roast
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 8 cups chicken broth (or 4 cans)
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 8 cloves garlic, pressed
  • ½ lb tomatillos (about 8 medium), chopped
  • 1-2 serrano chiles, minced
  • 1 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes with juice
  • 2 cups mild diced green chiles
  • 1 cup hot diced green chiles
  • 1½ tbsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 cup flour
  • salt & pepper to taste
  1. Cut the pork roast in half (to sear more of the surface) and smear with 2 tbsp olive oil. Generously sprinkle salt and fresh ground pepper on all sides. Sear on medium high heat.
  2. Put in a crockpot, add the chicken broth and water, and cook on high for 1 hour. Reduce heat to low and cook another 2-3 hours.
  3. Meanwhile, sauté onion, garlic, tomatillo, and serrano in 2 tbsp olive oil. Puree 1 cup mild green chiles with ½ cup of the liquid from the crockpot. Set aside.
  4. When done (after 3 hours of cooking), fish the pork out of the crockpot and set aside to cool for 15 minutes. Take 3 cups of the broth from the crockpot and set aside to cool for 15 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, add the onion mixture, spices, tomatoes, and all the green chiles (including pureed).
  6. Gradually add the broth to the flour, stirring constantly to ensure no lumps. Then pour the flour mixture into the crockpot gradually, stirring constantly to blend in.
  7. Shred the pork with a fork and add to crockpot. Cook on low for another hour, stirring occasionally.
  8. Serve with tortillas or use as a sauce over eggs, burritos, or whatever!

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12 comments to Pork Green Chili (Colorado Style)

Cant wait to try this,Thanks

no instructions for the spices or tomatoes

You add spices and tomatoes at the same time as the onions. I’ve updated the recipe on the site. Thanks for pointing this out.

I am a texan, but don’t care for tomatillos, what can I sub?

My vote? Substitute about 3/4 cup diced mild green chiles. You could also substitute tomatoes. It’s all a matter of taste, but either way will work very well. The tomatillos add that tart, tangy taste, but that pure green chile taste is also very good (and depending on where you are from, some think it’s more authentic).

A cup of flour. 3 cups of broth and 1 cup of flour would almost make dough.

This recipe has 10 cups of liquid and one cup of flour, not 3 cups liquid. Yes, this is definitely a thickened chili, but it’s nowhere near dough. Personally, I like both thickened & unthickened chili … but for different purposes or occasions. I like thickened chili on top of a burrito because it sticks rather than just running off. Try it!

What kinds of Green Chilis should I use? (I am not from Colorado, do they sell them simply as Hot Green Chili or Mild? I was thinking of using polbalnos and a Seranos or 2? Roasting first, then peeling and take the seeds out then chopping. Will that work out ok?

People who don’t live in Colorado often have to resort to canned or frozen chiles. Nearly all grocery stores have canned and they come in mild and hot. Many places have frozen, for instance WalMart carries frozen Select New Mexico green chiles in many parts of the country. Their chile comes in mild, hot, and jalapeno. Many world champion green chili cooks just use canned.

Poblanos would make a good chili, though the flavor is different than classic green chiles. Serranos are much hotter than most people like for their green chili, though they are used in many, many green chili recipes in small amounts to adjust the heat to the desired level. Hope this helps.

The Poblano Pepper worked Great! absolutely loved this recipe. Used a 3 Lb. pork shoulder, Wouldn’t change a thing.

Outside of the Southwest where fresh chiles are abundant, one can often find green chiles in the refrigerator section of the grocery store. They are often labeled “Chile Baca”. Just an FYI.

[…] From this state they are frequently eaten as-is, frozen for year-round use, or commonly we make pork based green chile which is used as a tasty dipping sauce, over eggs, mac-n-cheese, and to smother burritos or french […]


Individual Chili Strudels

Preheat oven to 400℉ (200℃). Grease a 15½ x 15½ x 1-inch jelly roll pan.

Place 1 leaf of phyllo on a towel with the long edge in front of you, and brush lightly with melted butter. Place a second leaf on top, and brush again with butter. Top with a third leaf (do not brush with butter), and cut the stack in half crosswise.

Spoon about ¾ cup chili along the near edge of each phyllo stack, leaving about 1-inch border uncovered on each side.

Holding the towel corners nearest you, flip the towel up, causing the phyllo to roll over on itself and cover the filling. (you can do both stacks with one flip.) Turn the edges in over the filling and continue to roll 1 strudel at a time to the end. Carefully place each strudel on the greased pan, seam side down. Repeat 3 more times with the remaining chili and phyllo. Brush the strudel tops with melted butter, place the pan in the middle of the preheated oven, and bake for 12 to 14 minutes until the strudels are crisp and golden brown.

If you have an attractive oven-safe serving platter, transfer the strudels to it, and sprinkle the cheese on top. (Otherwise, leave the strudels in the pan.) Return the strudels to the oven until the cheese melts, about 3 minutes. Remove pan from oven, garnish the strudels, and serve 1 strudel to each guest, placing some olives, onions, peppers and tomatoes on each plate.


Lumpiang Shanghai (Filipino Spring Rolls)

That these are the best spring rolls is no exaggeration. Whenever I serve these Lumpiang Shanghai, they’re gone in seconds. True crunchy deliciousness in every bite. Serve with a sweet chili sauce!

  • 1 kilo / 2 pounds ground pork
  • 8 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 small Onions, minced
  • 1 big or 2 medium size Carrots, finely chopped
  • 5-6 tablespoons Soy sauce or to taste
  • 1 Jicama (Singkamas) or a small tub of Water Chestnut, finely chopped (optional – but I do love the extra crunch and flavor either brings. )
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
  • Oil for frying (enough to cover the rolls)
  • 2 packs of paper thin Spring Roll wrappers (can be found in Asian stores), thawed
  1. Heat a little oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Saute the garlic just until aromatic (less than a minute). Brown the ground pork in the pan and season with a little salt and pepper (just to give the meat a little flavor so go easy with the salt). Stir the meat to prevent clumping.
  2. When the meat has changed its color add the onions. Cook for another 3-4 minutes or until the chopped onions have softened. Add the carrots and season with the soy sauce. Stir to mix. Lower the heat and simmer for about half an hour (to allow the meat to absorb the seasonings). At this point, I add the water chestnuts or jicama and just let it cook for another couple of minutes. Adjust seasoning to your taste. Set aside to cool down. Drain completely to remove any excess liquid. I use a strainer to do this. It should be dry and not dripping with sauce.
  3. Prepare the spring roll wrappers and have a small bowl filled water near you. Place about 1 heaping tablespoon of the cold pork mixture in one of the corners of the wrapper. Spread the filling into the wrapper horizontally. Roll the meat mixture towards the middle. Fold both sides inward to seal, then continue to roll until you have about an inch left of the wrapper. Using your finger, brush the edges with a little water to seal completely. Make sure it is tightly secured. Place the finished roll on a deep baking dish (casserole) with the sealed side downwards. Repeat until all the meat is gone. To ensure that the seal does not open while you are frying it, I keep the rolls overnight in the refrigerator. This way they seal properly and won’t open when frying.
  4. Before you heat the oil, take the spring rolls out of the fridge so it will be a little warmer when you fry it. (Others have fried it from frozen, I heard). Pour cooking oil (enough to cover the rolls) in a deep pan and turn heat to medium and let heat up for about 10-12 mins. (If you have a deep fryer, preheat to about 350 F). To make sure the oil is hot enough, test one roll and see if it browns quickly. Fry the lumpia in batches until they turn golden brown. This shouldn’t take too long if the oil is hot enough and because they have been previously cooked. Do not overcrowd the rolls to allow them to brown evenly.
  5. Place the cooked rolls in a strainer with paper towels to drain the oil while the other rolls are cooking. Transfer the cooked ones in a serving dish. You may again wrap them in paper towels to extract any remaining oil.
  6. To double the amount, cut the rolls in half. Serve with sweet chili sauce, a yummy chutney or even plain old ketchup as dip! Yum!

Yield: 60-80 pieces depending on the size
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cooking Time: 30 Minutes
Total Time: 1 Hour


Cook's Notes

HOW TO ROLL AN EGG ROLL
1. Filling It Up: Lay 3 or 4 egg-roll wrappers flat on counter. (Keep other wrappers covered with a damp paper towel.) Place 1/3 cup pork mixture in center of each.
2. Folding It Up: Using a pastry brush, wet border with egg. Fold point of wrapper that's closest to you over the pork mixture, and tuck under the filling.
3. Folding It In: Fold both side corners toward center of wrapper (they won't meet in the center). It should look like an open envelope.
4. Finishing It Up: Tightly roll up filled pocket to close wrapper, then gently press down to seal the edges.


  • 46 years we’ve been playing restaurant
  • 1 legendary jingle to end all jingles
  • $73M raised for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital®
  • 50K+ Team Members who make it all possible

There for each other since 1975.

ChiliHeads genuinely support each other and are passionate about creating meaningful connections and memories. We focus on putting others ahead of ourselves because when we lift each other up in our restaurants and our communities, we elevate our own lives, too.

Inclusion

A close-knit family of thousands.

We’re made up of more than 50,000 amazing Team Members and no two are alike. At Chili’s, everyone is valued, respected and listened to. It’s like a great big holiday meal … with everyone at the kids’ table. Our unique differences make us stronger as a team and help us thrive and excel in this fast-paced and sometimes
crazy restaurant business.

Enjoyment

Proving that work can actually be fun.

As ChiliHeads, we take the job seriously – but not ourselves. We have a great time because we want our Guests to do the same. And if you’re not having fun in your career, why bother?


Shutterstock

A killer recipe for this classic. These bad boys are wrapped in a doughy blanket that's lined with a spread of garlic, Dijon mustard, and cheddar cheese—a great party app. Of course, you can always ditch the Dijon and garlic for fussy kid eaters, and drop the cheese to go lighter on the calories.

Get the recipe from Simple Comfort Food.


Dallas rideshare company to roll into Houston

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston. The interiors have a plexiglass barrier installed inside between the driver and passengers.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston. The interiors have a plexiglass barrier installed inside between the driver and passengers.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The app allows passengers to do things like select the music and the lighting mood in their vehicle. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

ALTO, a Dallas-based company, is rolling out a new ride-hailing service in Houston this week. The company uses uniform vehicles, a fleet of Buick Enclaves photographed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Houston.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

Alto, a new rideshare company based in Dallas, will roll into view in Houston as it looks to expand its reach and compete with Uber and Lyft.

The app-based service, which arrives in Houston Thursday, looks to distinguish itself in the market by offering what it calls a consistent experience by managing its own fleet of 200 luxury Buick sports utility vehicles and hiring employees to drive them rather than relying on independent contractors, as competittors such as Uber and Lyft do.

The company, founded in 2018, will also launch in Los Angeles in the coming weeks and aims to expand nationally, said co-founder and Chief Executive Will Coleman.

&ldquoWe believe that showcasing our model there in California, and particularly in Los Angeles, helps contribute to that important debate around employment, which we believe we&rsquore on the winning side of,&rdquo Coleman said.

Alto&rsquos expansion comes as a debate rages in California over how companies such as Uber and Lyft should treat its drivers. There, a new state employment law requires the gig economy companies to classify drivers as employees, but voters could exempt the companies via a ballot measure in November.

Alto also is expanding as the coronovirus pandemic batters the ride-hailing industry. Uber, the market leader, reported a 75 percent decline in ridership during the quarter ended June 30, as people grew wary of leaving the house and entering enclosed spaces.

Alto&rsquos business has shrunk, too. Business is still down about 30 percent from pre-pandemic levels, Coleman said. &ldquoThere&rsquos some people in Dallas that are going to continue to not get into cars,&rdquo he said, &ldquoso our total customer base is smaller.&rdquo

That makes expanding into new territories more important to the company&rsquos growth, Coleman said. Houston seemed like a natural next step, he said, given its proximity and size &mdash it&rsquos the nation&rsquos fourth largest city. It also appealed because the company caters to the business community, which in Houston is large and international.

Business travel from the airport was a big sales driver before the pandemic, he said, and is beginning to pick back up. &ldquoPeople are looking for safe ways to move again,&rdquo Coleman said.

But Ali Mogharabi, senior equity analyst for the financial services firm Morningstar, said Alto faces an uphill battle even in the best of times &mdash which they are not. Few people are traveling or heading to urban offices, two large components of the rideshare market.

&ldquoThe ride-hailing market is not in good shape,&rdquo he said.

Mogharabi said he doesn&rsquot expect ridership for Uber, which claims about 70 percent of the rideshare market, to return to pre-pandemic levels until 2023. Lyft accounts for about 30 percent of the market, he said.

Newcomers will have a tough time breaking into a market so dominated by the two-ride hailing companies, Mogharabi said. But Alto said it believed putting drivers on the payroll gives them an advantage.

Alto can train them in safety protocols and monitor their driving, he said, and that&rsquos even more important during the pandemic, which placed more emphasis on health and safety.

Inside Alto&rsquos vehicles, bucket seats offer leg room, a plexiglass barrier separates passengers from the driver and the interior is disinfected between trips with a sanitizing mist. A high efficiency particulate air filter cleans the air, uniformed drivers wear masks and customers can use the app to inform drivers about whether or not they&rsquod prefer a conversation-free ride.

Alto monitors driving behaviors using onboard cameras and telematic devices that track the car&rsquos movements. To encourage a sense of consistency from trip to trip, Coleman said the company even uses a trademarked scent that has a subtle, balmy aroma.

&ldquoThose are things that only we can do because we have that type of control,&rdquo he said. &ldquoOtherwise, you&rsquore at the whim of whatever driver you might get.&rdquo

In exchange, drivers get a more reliable schedule than those working as independent contractors for other companies. Alto offers company-sponsored health insurance and paid time off.

One of its new Houston drivers, Rachel Barrett, said she chose Alto because &ldquothis seemed more stable.&rdquo She&rsquod been working for Apple but grew tired of working from home, she said, and started looking at jobs in the rideshare industry.

Alto charges more per trip than Uber, the market leader. One 10-mile trip across Houston (or 22 minutes) costs $38.79, including a service charge of $5.92. The same trip would cost $17.71 via Uber&rsquos cheapest option, or $30.57 under its larger-cabin UberXL option.

&ldquoWe like to think of it as an accessible luxury,&rdquo Coleman said. &ldquoI like to think of it as Starbucks.&rdquo


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