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10 Food Terms You Didn’t Know Were Trademarked

10 Food Terms You Didn’t Know Were Trademarked



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When you make a photocopy, do you call it making a Xerox? When you need to blow your nose, do you grab a Kleenex? And when you cut yourself, do you reach for a Band-Aid? You may not realize it, but each of those is a specific trademarked brand. And there are plenty of terms in the food world that you may not realize are in the same boat.

10 Food Terms You Didn’t Know Were Trademarked (Slideshow)

When a product is brought to market, its manufacturer trademarks it; that is, they register its name in order to prevent another company from unauthorized usage, called trademark infringement. We’re sure you’ve encountered knockoffs of Rolex watches and Fendi purses; those counterfeit goods are illegally infringing on the companies’ trademarks. While it’s not illegal for you to call an adhesive bandage a Band-Aid even if it’s manufactured by a different company, that company obviously can’t just go ahead and call its own adhesive bandage a Band-Aid.

Over time, when a product is so popular that the brand name essentially becomes synonymous with the product itself, that’s called trademark erosion, and while it might sound good for the brand to become a household name, companies actually work hard to prevent it; once a brand becomes a common name it essentially becomes genericized, it can no longer be registered. Many common terms became genericized so long ago that you probably had no idea that they were once trademarked brand names; these include escalator, laundromat, heroin, zipper, and trampoline. This is all obviously rather complicated.

In the food world, there are plenty of genericized trademarks both protected and unprotected, as well as non-genericized brands that you most likely never even realized were trademarked in the first place. Read on to learn about 10 food names that are (or once were) registered trademarks of specific brands.


Broccolini is a hybrid of broccoli and Chinese kale (called gai lan), and was developed in 1993 by the Sakata Seed Company of Yokohama, Japan. It was brought to the United States in 1998 by Mann Produce Company, who trademarked the term broccolini. Around the world, it’s also called baby broccoli, asparation, bimi, tenderstem broccoli, and broccoletti.


While today butterscotch is made by heating brown sugar and butter and is as generic a term as caramel, the original butterscotch recipe called for butter, sugar, and treacle, and was invented in 1817 by the Parkinson’s Doncaster Butterscotch Company. It was sold under the brand name of Doncaster Butterscotch. Parkinson’s was still in business until just a few years ago, but the term butterscotch became genericized long ago.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.


40 Rules You Didn't Know 'MasterChef' Contestants Have To Follow

Think you have what it takes to make it in the MasterChef kitchen? After 10 seasons of the reality cooking competition, we're diving into what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. From 12-hour days to a strict no recipe policy, we've rounded up the juiciest, most surprising rules that even the show's biggest fans probably don't know.

All applicants must be 18 or older. If you don't meet the age requirement, you can always apply for MasterChef Junior.

Since its conception, MasterChef has inspired franchises all around the world. However, to compete on the U.S. version of the show, you must be a legal citizen or permanent resident of the United States.

Sorry, if you're a professional chef or your income comes from cooking or preparing food, you're not allowed to compete.

Aside from some pre-registration online, it's relatively easy to attend an open casting call for MasterChef. You just have to prepare your best dish and bring it in to be sampled by a panel of expert chefs. Piece of cake.

Gordon Ramsay doesn't attend the open calls, but the panel of judges includes people who could give him a run for his money. "The chefs were tasting food and also critiquing, so people were getting critiqued on the spot which was not something I had expected. Then, on top of that, you're also talking to producers who wanna know what your personality is like," former contestant Elise Mayfield told AV Club.

Making sure your dish is the proper temperature before it's served is up to you. Mayfield told AV Club her trick: "So I came in with two insulated lunch bags. One of them was an aluminum foil takeout container and I had a sock&mdasha clean sock!&mdashfull of rice that I had heated up in the microwave, along with these glove warmer things so I had that and a heated bag of rice in the insulated lunch bag."

After your audition, the casting department and producers can take a long time to make their final decisions on the cast. According to Mayfield from season five, it took four months before she got a final decision from production.

Filming for MasterChef takes place in Los Angeles. If you make it to the competition round of the show, that means packing up your knives and heading out west.

Although casting takes months, once you hear back from production, you don&rsquot have a lot of time to get to LA. One season five competitor had just 10 days to pack for Los Angeles after learning she made it on the show.

About 100 applicants make the journey out to Los Angeles and are put up in a hotel by production. After they arrive, there's one more round of auditions and 70 people are sent home. "I was basically told, 'This is not a guarantee that you're on the show, this is not a guarantee you're going to meet the judges, this is a not guarantee of anything. It's just the final audition,'" Mayfield once said.

During the last round of auditions, each prospective contestant has to meet with production's psychologist for a formal evaluation. According to former contestant Jessie Glenn, you are never showed the results, so it's unclear what they are looking for in the evaluation.

Contestants are also required to meet with a private investigator who will perform a background check on you. The investigative meeting felt "invasive," one former contestant said.

When contestants journey to Los Angeles, they have to plan as if they will be gone for the entirety of filming. Producers tell them to pack as if they&rsquoll be gone for a few months and most quit their jobs for the show, while some are lucky enough to just take a leave of absence. "For me, I was really lucky because I was able to keep my job," Mayfield said: "A lot of people really quit their jobs to go to that show,"

Most of the show&rsquos behind-the-scenes secrets will remain secret, as the contestants are required to sign NDAs before officially joining the show. However, there's one contestant who didn't sign the show's tightly bound contract: season three's Jessie Glenn. According to Healthline, Glenn began asking questions when she received the contract and the show didn&rsquot notice she hadn&rsquot signed it until after she was eliminated.

Contestants on the show are put up in a hotel for the duration of filming. Additionally, their transportation and food expenses are paid for by the show.