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Books for Cooks: Vegetables Are the New Meat

Books for Cooks: Vegetables Are the New Meat



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A proper roast chicken once signaled the skill of a cook; now the marker is a roasted carrot. Led by chefs and inspired by their relationships with farmers, this cultural shift reflects an evolution of American cuisine as we return to our agricultural roots. Home cooks, take note: These new books will inspire a lifetime of farmers' market meals.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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Everything-but-the-Bagel Breakfast Pockets

I’m not really sure where April went – I’m a little bit shocked that it’s been almost 3 weeks since I’ve posted here. We’ve been super busy with our new sitter / virtual schooling / in person schooling routine – which also means that I’m actually going into work more (and taking way less vacation time!) and have way less time to cook, bake, read, craft and blog.

Plus, it’s been gorgeous outside. All we want to do is sit outside watching the kids play in the yard. That is, when they’re not at an activity. After a year of nothing, we finally decided to put both kids in some outdoor sports (masks on!) so that they can get some fresh air, run around, and see friends. They’re enjoying it but it does mean for busy weeks for the cooks and chauffeurs in the family!

All that busy has been making it a challenge to really be cooking and eating healthier. I’ve been trying to stick to easy meals, but easy does not always mean healthy or satisfying or filling.

Take these Everything-but-the-Bagel Breakfast Pockets. My husband and I (yes, even me, the non-egg eater) really enjoy them. But man, do they take a while to make! I usually make a double batch and need to carve out a good 60-90 minutes to get it all done, from start to finish. Not hard, just several steps and almost half an hour of cooking time. BUT, these bagel pockets do keep me full all morning long, even when my morning starts at 5:30am. So I call it a win.

So whether you’re looking for a make ahead breakfast for busy weeks, or perhaps brunch (ahem! Mother’s Day is coming up!), these Everything-But-The-Bagel Breakfast Pockets are a win!

More Great Brunch Recipes:

    • Avocado Toast with Egg from Making Miracles
    • Chicken Chilaquiles from Karen’s Kitchen Stories
    • Chorizo Eggs Benedict with Chipotle Hollandaise from Sweet Beginnings
    • Eggs Benedict with Asparagus from Art of Natural Living
    • Everything but the Bagel Breakfast Pockets from Books n’ Cooks (below!)
    • Hash Brown Potato Pie from Family Around the Table
    • Rose Mimosa from Cheese Curd in Paradise
    • Rosemary, Ham, and Parmesan Cheese Scones from Blogghetti
    • Spicy Huevos Grilled Cheese from Palatable Pastime
    • Spinach and Bacon Quiche with Swiss and Gruyere from Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks
    • Tapioca Pearl Stir-fry/Sabudana Kichdi/Javvarisi Upma from Magical Ingredients
    • Wine and Cheese Muffins from That Recipe

    You can also follow us and get more great recipe inspiration in our Facebook group, Recipes From Our Dinner Table. Join our group and share your recipes, too! While you’re at it, join our Pinterest board, too!


    PUBLISHERS WEEKLY MAY 20, 2013

    As more and more people embrace vegetable-heavy diets, the need for a primer on these wildly varying foods is great. Yonan, the Washington Post's Cooking for One columnist and author of Serve Yourself, comes at the subject from the solitary perspective, showing how to cook flavorful and healthy nonmeat meals that serve one. Yonan starts off with an excellent chapter that both novices and experienced cooks will find useful: how to store and use up extra ingredients, including herbs, avocado, citrus, celery, and beans. He offers fresh options on salads, such as cold spicy ramen noodles with tofu and kimchi kale and mango ni oise and Asian bean and barley salad. Sandwiches and soups also get a makeover: recipes include curried mushroom bean burgers vegan sloppy joes and green gumbo. Spinach enchiladas sweet potato galette with mushrooms and kale and chicken-fried cauliflower with miso-onion gravy offer appetizing alternatives to standard vegetarian meals. Desserts seem to be an afterthought in most vegetable cookbooks, but Yonan doesn't disappoint with his faux tart with instant lemon-ginger pudding and one-peach crisp with cardamom and honey. Recipes are designed to feed one but are easily doubled or can serve nicely as a side dish if desired. The greatly appealing dishes in this collection open up a whole new culinary world for veggie lovers.


    Frances Mayes, author of seven books on Italy, including Under the Tuscan Sun

    "Domenica Marchetti has created a work of art, just as so many Italian masters who have come before her have done. Fresh vegetables, prepared so beautifully at the peak of ripeness, result in a book you won't want to live without. The really special part is that Domenica creates a perfect marriage between classic Italian vegetable dishes and the seasonal abundance that is available at your local farmers' market. This is truly an inspirational cookbook and one that I will enthusiastically return to for years to come."


    On the importance of teaching fundamentals:

    At Rustic Canyon, "the larder" refers to a collection of fundamental recipes and techniques including seasoning blends, condiments and dough, along with drying, fermentation and pickling. A section of On Vegetables is dedicated to these concepts.

    I felt like in my education, I worked in high-end restaurants to where I knew how to cook fancy but, I didn’t know how to cook simple food. I wanted to teach my cooks really strong foundations so that they could be creative in their own way and be their own style of chefs. As a result, we developed the larder at Rustic Canyon and then it was just a matter of plugging those recipes in. For instance, we have a great aioli, so we were like, "let’s add it to this dish." We also have a great gnocchi and that can rotate with whatever seasonal vegetables are available at the market. It became a good way to get everyone in the kitchen on the same page and to have these strong foundations to base the whole menu off of.


    Six Seasons

    Named a Best Cookbook of the Year by the Wall Street Journal , The Atlantic , Bon Appétit , Food Network Magazine , Every Day with Rachael Ray , USA Today , Seattle Times , Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel , Library Journal , Eater, and more

    &ldquoIf you&rsquore finding pantry cooking to mean too many uninspired pots of beans, might I suggest Six Seasons? [It] both highlights a perfectly ripe plant . . . and shows you how to transform slightly less peak-season produce (yes, the cabbage lurking in the back of your fridge right now counts) with heat, spice, acid, and fat.&rdquo
    &mdashEpicurious 

    &ldquoNever before have I seen so many fascinating, delicious, easy recipes in one book. . . . [ Six Seasons is] about as close to a perfect cookbook as I have seen . . . a book beginner and seasoned cooks alike will reach for repeatedly.&rdquo
    &mdashLucky Peach

    Joshua McFadden, chef and owner of renowned trattoria Ava Gene&rsquos in Portland, Oregon, is a vegetable whisperer. After years racking up culinary cred at New York City restaurants like Lupa, Momofuku, and Blue Hill, he managed the trailblazing Four Season Farm in coastal Maine, where he developed an appreciation for every part of the plant and learned to coax the best from vegetables at each stage of their lives.

    In Six Seasons , his first book, McFadden channels both farmer and chef, highlighting the evolving attributes of vegetables throughout their growing seasons&mdashan arc from spring to early summer to midsummer to the bursting harvest of late summer, then ebbing into autumn and, finally, the earthy, mellow sweetness of winter. Each chapter begins with recipes featuring raw vegetables at the start of their season. As weeks progress, McFadden turns up the heat&mdashgrilling and steaming, then moving on to sautés, pan roasts, braises, and stews. His ingenuity is on display in 225 revelatory recipes that celebrate flavor at its peak.

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    Books also available at
    Look Inside

    Meet the Authors

    Joshua McFadden

    Martha Holmberg

    Review quotes

    &ldquoA great book. Period. . . . Never before have I seen so many fascinating, delicious, easy recipes in one book. . . . In fact, it&rsquos about as close to a perfect cookbook as I have seen. What McFadden and Holmberg have achieved is no small feat: This is a book that will educate nearly everyone who picks it up, a book beginner and seasoned cooks alike will reach for repeatedly. It&rsquos the rare book that achieves what it sets out to do, and manages to do so in a manner that is both appetizing and engaging. It is accessible without sacrificing its artistry.&rdquo
    &mdash Lucky Peach
     
    &ldquoThe book&rsquos appealingly simple recipes are focused on delivering big flavor.&rdquo
    &mdash The Wall Street Journal , The Best Books to Give to the Food Lover in Your Life

    &ldquo Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables is poised to join the veggie canon. . . . The flavors are big. . . . They&rsquore also layered and complex, despite their apparent simplicity. What will really change your cooking is [McFadden&rsquos] approach to seasoning. . . . Trust me: Read this book and you&rsquoll never look at cabbage the same way again.&rdquo
    &mdash Bon Appétit

     &ldquoAchieves the near-impossible: Recipe after recipe of restaurant-quality food that isn&rsquot difficult to put together.&rdquo
    &mdashEater

    &ldquoStellar mix-and-match recipes that highlight produce at its gorgeous peak.&rdquo
    &mdashFood & Wine
     
    &ldquoThe Six Seasons cookbook. Have you bought it yet? I know this is awfully bossy of me, but I think you should. I think that if you, like me, delight in inventive but not overly complicated vegetable preparations (225 of them, even), things you hadn&rsquot thought of but that you&rsquoll immediately tuck into your repertoire, you&rsquore going to love this book as much as I do. I confess I&rsquove had it for almost a year. In that year, I&rsquove been almost overwhelmed with how much I&rsquove wanted to cook from it.&rdquo
    &mdashSmittenKitchen.com

    &ldquoExciting flavor combinations mean this is no mere guide to vegetables but a primer on how to make them taste their exciting best.&rdquo
    &mdash Fine Cooking
     
    &ldquoDownright thrilling. . . . Divided into six seasons rather than the traditional four&mdasha more accurate reflection of what&rsquos happening in the fields&mdashthe book encourages readers to embrace what he calls &lsquothe joyful ride of eating with the seasons. . . .&rsquo On page after page, McFadden presents a deliciously enlightening way of cooking with vegetables.&rdquo
    &mdashSunset

    &ldquoEnduringly rewarding. I am utterly consumed with Six Seasons and feel I could cook from it every day without tiring.&rdquo
    &mdashNigella Lawson
     
    &ldquoThis cookbook might put meat out of business. It&rsquos that good. . . . A rare source of new ideas about vegetables. McFadden&rsquos forward-looking sensibility infuses every recipe.&rdquo
    &mdashPortland Monthly
     
    &ldquoBrilliant.&rdquo
    &mdashFood52

    &ldquo[This is] a cookbook I&rsquove gotten a little obsessed with. . . . The book offers inspiring treatments for vegetables that are often relegated to a boring crudité tray&mdashif you&rsquore looking for a new way to treat celery or cabbage, you need a copy.&rdquo
    &mdashSerious Eats
     
    &ldquo Six Seasons is a beautiful book. But it&rsquos more than a pretty face: It&rsquos a practical primer that begs to come into the kitchen&mdashand won&rsquot disappoint once you get it there.&rdquo
    &mdashSanta Fe New Mexican
     
    &ldquoAn exuberant, engaging approach to vegetables. . . . Six Seasons is a joy. . . . [It] manages to feel comprehensive without sacrificing delight and humor.&rdquo
    &mdashPortland Press Herald
     
    &ldquoThe most exciting approach to home cooking I&rsquove seen all year. . . . Six Seasons is one of the most satisfying cookbooks I&rsquove purchased in years, and McFadden&rsquos insights into seasoning are invaluable, even for an experienced home cook.&rdquo
    &mdashWillamette Week
     
    &ldquoA must-have cookbook that stands out from the crowd of vegetable-centric cookbooks. . . . This cookbook deserves to become a well-thumbed, vital addition to any kitchen.&rdquo
    &mdashPublishers Weekly , starred review
     
    &ldquoEssential techniques that can help cooks become better at preparing seasonal and local vegetables. . . . Attractive vegetable recipes range from brightly colored raw and cooked salads to indulgent appetizers, pastas, and baked goods. Under McFadden&rsquos tutelage, cooks will learn how to bring out the best in every humble vegetable.&rdquo
    &mdashLibrary Journal , starred review
     
    &ldquoMcFadden&rsquos debut cookbook is an invaluable resource for all things veggie.&rdquo
    &mdash Booklist, starred review
     
    &ldquoVisionary. . . . Beautifully produced.&rdquo
    &mdash BookPage
     
    &ldquoGlorious.&rdquo
    &mdash Atlanta Journal-Constitution
     
    &ldquoThis is not a cookbook for coffee tables or artfully curated bookshelves! Its recipes demand to be tasted until the pages are dog-eared and sauce-splattered and stick together. Compulsory for the home cook.&rdquo
    &mdashDan Barber, chef/co-owner of Blue Hill
     
    &ldquoJoshua McFadden has the soul of a farmer, and his recipes are beautifully in tune with the seasons and the land.&rdquo
    &mdashAlice Waters, owner of Chez Panisse
     
    &ldquoJoshua [understands] vegetables from the perspective of both a farmer and chef. His mouthwatering and terrific solutions . . . get the most out of vegetables from their beginning to their last act on our plates.&rdquo
    &mdashDavid Chang, chef/owner of Momofuku
     
    &ldquoWe always knew Joshua was a vegetable magician, but this is so much more. We learned something new on every page. Six Seasons is a brilliant cookbook.&rdquo
    &mdashBarbara Damrosch and Eliot Coleman, cofounders of Four Season Farm


    Epicurious Ditches Beef In A Move It Calls 'Pro-Planet'

    Digital food magazine Epicurious has announced it will stop publishing new recipes featuring beef in an effort to promote more sustainable cooking. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

    Digital food magazine Epicurious has announced it will stop publishing new recipes featuring beef in an effort to promote more sustainable cooking.

    Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

    Digital food magazine Epicurious will no longer publish recipes featuring beef in what it says is an effort to help home cooks become more environmentally friendly.

    The Condé Nast-owned publication announced the change in an article published Monday but revealed that it "actually pulled the plug on beef well over a year ago." Senior editor Maggie Hoffman and former digital director David Tamarkin explained that because of cattle's carbon footprint, cutting out — or even cutting down on — beef makes space for more climate-conscious recipes.

    Life Kit

    Eating Less Meat Helps The Environment. Here Are Recipes To Help

    "We know that some people might assume that this decision signals some sort of vendetta against cows — or the people who eat them. But this decision was not made because we hate hamburgers (we don't!)," they wrote. "Instead, our shift is solely about sustainability, about not giving airtime to one of the world's worst climate offenders. We think of this decision as not anti-beef but rather pro-planet."

    Today we announced that Epicurious is cutting out beef. It won’t appear in new Epi recipes, articles, newsletters, or on social. This isn’t a vendetta against cows or people who eat them. It’s a shift about sustainability not anti-beef but pro-planet. https://t.co/yQ8PrtChtE

    &mdash epicurious (@epicurious) April 26, 2021

    Going forward, the magazine will not feature beef in new recipes, articles, newsletters or social media content, though its previously published beef content will remain online and in archive-based recipe galleries.

    It actually enacted this policy in the fall of 2019 and has published beef recipes only a "small handful of times" since then, as explained in an FAQ. Focusing on vegetarian alternatives for summer cookouts, for example, it has offered creative takes on meatless meat and grilled vegetables instead. Hoffman and Tamarkin said that readers had "rallied around the recipes we published in beef's place."

    "The traffic and engagement numbers on these stories don't lie," they wrote. "When given an alternative to beef, American cooks get hungry."

    So why beef, and why now? The editors outlined a number of their considerations, which all point to fighting climate change.

    The single step of cutting out beef constitutes a big leap toward becoming more environmentally friendly, they explained. Citing an expert with the Natural Resources Defense Council, a nonprofit environmental advocacy group, they said cattle contribute to climate change in multiple ways.

    The Salt

    To Slow Global Warming, U.N. Warns Agriculture Must Change

    Those include the considerable quantity of corn and soybeans that is grown using pesticides and fertilizer to feed cattle the amount of climate-polluting methane that cows release into the atmosphere high rates of deforestation to make space for cows and the amount of water that is alternately needed to raise cattle and polluted as a result of runoff from their manure.

    The editors noted that scaling back on beef is not in itself "a silver bullet," as most animals — and even dairy products — have their own environmental costs. But the cost of beef is especially high, they said.

    Nearly 15% of greenhouse gas emissions globally come from livestock, with the vast majority of those traced back to beef specifically, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Cows are 20 times less efficient to raise than beans and roughly three times less efficient than poultry and pork.

    Hoffman and Tamarkin said they decided to announce their decision now because beef consumption has risen in recent years, and they believe the "conversation about sustainable cooking clearly needs to be louder." They added that they hope the rest of American food media will join in.

    While acknowledging that the fight against climate change must involve state and federal policy changes, the magazine described its editorial decision as a form of policy itself. Plus, the editors said, individual actions — such as buying chickpeas or alt-meat instead of beef at the grocery store — add up, and send a signal to individuals, industries and policymakers.

    "Epi's agenda is the same as it has always been: to inspire home cooks to be better, smarter, and happier in the kitchen," they wrote. "The only change is that we now believe that part of getting better means cooking with the planet in mind. If we don't, we'll end up with no planet at all."

    The announcement came as the relationship between cattle and climate change was already in the spotlight for an unrelated controversy.

    After an article by the British tabloid The Daily Mail falsely claimed last week that President Joe Biden's climate proposals would enact limits on Americans' red meat consumption, numerous conservative lawmakers and commentators took to Twitter and Fox News to voice their opposition to the alleged policy proposal.

    Environment

    How Fast Will Biden Need To Move On Climate? Really, Really Fast

    The false claims were amplified by figures including Donald Trump Jr., Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Rep. Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Idaho Gov. Brad Little and Fox News hosts including Jesse Watters and John Roberts, who later acknowledged on air that the channel's coverage had "incorrectly implied" Biden's climate plan would restrict red meat consumption.

    Tom Vilsack, the Biden administration's secretary of agriculture, dismissed those claims during a virtual briefing on Monday, as Politico reported.

    "There's no desire, no effort, no press release, no policy paper — none of that — that would support the notion that the Biden administration is going to suggest that people eat less meat," he said. "Or that USDA has some program designed to reduce meat consumption. It's simply not the case."


    “Depression soup" and “slumgullion” were essentially meals of whatever you had. A can of corn, a can of green beans or a bag of rice — in the pot it went. A community stew was essentially the same thing, only neighbors would chip in vegetables, meat or pasta. The ingredients were combined and everyone that contributed took their share.

    • 1 ½ lbs. of ground beef
    • ½ c. macaroni, dry
    • ½ c. onions
    • ½ c. celery
    • 3 ½ quarts water
    • 1 large can of tomatoes
    • Salt to taste

    Brown the ground beef, add the rest of the ingredients except the macaroni. Cook until vegetables are tender. Add macaroni and cook until done.

    Canned goods were fairly easily accessible during the Depression and this salad used fresh garden ingredients as well.

    Depression salad

    Canned goods were fairly easily accessible during the Depression and this salad used fresh garden ingredients as well.

    • 1 can yellow hominy, drained
    • 1 can black-eyed peas, drained
    • 1 green pepper, chopped
    • 1 tomato, chopped
    • 1 small onion, chopped
    • 2 ribs celery, diced
    • ¼ cup cooking oil, optional
    • ¼ cup vinegar
    • Salt and pepper to taste

    In a 1930 Indianapolis Star edition, a recipe for vinegar pie delighted home cooks who later praised the author for providing it. Also known as “mock lemon pie” or “poor man's pie,” the recipe was a creative use of alternate products when fruit was scarce.

    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1/3 cup flour
    • 1/4 cup vinegar
    • 1 1/4 cups water
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • Unbaked 9-inch pie shell
    • Nutmeg
    • Butter

    Mix together sugar, flour, vinegar, water and salt. Pour into unbaked pie shell.

    Sprinkle nutmeg on top. Dot surface with small pieces of butter.

    Bake at 350 degrees about 1 hour, or until mixture is bubbly and the crust is brown.

    Just remember, the Greatest Generation that won World War II was raised during the poverty of the Depression. Let’s not have toilet paper hoarding be our legacy of the coronavirus epidemic.


    Books for Cooks: Vegetables Are the New Meat - Recipes

    Winner, James Beard Award for Best Book in Vegetable-Focused Cooking

    Named a Best Cookbook of the Year by the Wall Street Journal , The Atlantic , Bon Appétit , Food Network Magazine , Every Day with Rachael Ray , USA Today , Seattle Times , Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel , Library Journal , Eater, and more

    &ldquoIf you&rsquore finding pantry cooking to mean too many uninspired pots of beans, might I suggest Six Seasons? [It] both highlights a perfectly ripe plant . . . and shows you how to transform slightly less peak-season produce (yes, the cabbage lurking in the back of your fridge right now counts) with heat, spice, acid, and fat.&rdquo
    &mdashEpicurious 

    &ldquoNever before have I seen so many fascinating, delicious, easy recipes in one book. . . . [ Six Seasons is] about as close to a perfect cookbook as I have seen . . . a book beginner and seasoned cooks alike will reach for repeatedly.&rdquo
    &mdashLucky Peach

    Joshua McFadden, chef and owner of renowned trattoria Ava Gene&rsquos in Portland, Oregon, is a vegetable whisperer. After years racking up culinary cred at New York City restaurants like Lupa, Momofuku, and Blue Hill, he managed the trailblazing Four Season Farm in coastal Maine, where he developed an appreciation for every part of the plant and learned to coax the best from vegetables at each stage of their lives.

    In Six Seasons , his first book, McFadden channels both farmer and chef, highlighting the evolving attributes of vegetables throughout their growing seasons&mdashan arc from spring to early summer to midsummer to the bursting harvest of late summer, then ebbing into autumn and, finally, the earthy, mellow sweetness of winter. Each chapter begins with recipes featuring raw vegetables at the start of their season. As weeks progress, McFadden turns up the heat&mdashgrilling and steaming, then moving on to sautés, pan roasts, braises, and stews. His ingenuity is on display in 225 revelatory recipes that celebrate flavor at its peak.

    Praise For Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables&hellip

    &ldquoA great book. Period. . . . Never before have I seen so many fascinating, delicious, easy recipes in one book. . . . In fact, it&rsquos about as close to a perfect cookbook as I have seen. What McFadden and Holmberg have achieved is no small feat: This is a book that will educate nearly everyone who picks it up, a book beginner and seasoned cooks alike will reach for repeatedly. It&rsquos the rare book that achieves what it sets out to do, and manages to do so in a manner that is both appetizing and engaging. It is accessible without sacrificing its artistry.&rdquo
    &mdash Lucky Peach
     
    &ldquoThe book&rsquos appealingly simple recipes are focused on delivering big flavor.&rdquo
    &mdash The Wall Street Journal , The Best Books to Give to the Food Lover in Your Life

    &ldquo Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables is poised to join the veggie canon. . . . The flavors are big. . . . They&rsquore also layered and complex, despite their apparent simplicity. What will really change your cooking is [McFadden&rsquos] approach to seasoning. . . . Trust me: Read this book and you&rsquoll never look at cabbage the same way again.&rdquo
    &mdash Bon Appétit

     &ldquoAchieves the near-impossible: Recipe after recipe of restaurant-quality food that isn&rsquot difficult to put together.&rdquo
    &mdashEater

    &ldquoStellar mix-and-match recipes that highlight produce at its gorgeous peak.&rdquo
    &mdashFood & Wine
     
    &ldquoThe Six Seasons cookbook. Have you bought it yet? I know this is awfully bossy of me, but I think you should. I think that if you, like me, delight in inventive but not overly complicated vegetable preparations (225 of them, even), things you hadn&rsquot thought of but that you&rsquoll immediately tuck into your repertoire, you&rsquore going to love this book as much as I do. I confess I&rsquove had it for almost a year. In that year, I&rsquove been almost overwhelmed with how much I&rsquove wanted to cook from it.&rdquo
    &mdashSmittenKitchen.com

    &ldquoExciting flavor combinations mean this is no mere guide to vegetables but a primer on how to make them taste their exciting best.&rdquo
    &mdash Fine Cooking
     
    &ldquoDownright thrilling. . . . Divided into six seasons rather than the traditional four&mdasha more accurate reflection of what&rsquos happening in the fields&mdashthe book encourages readers to embrace what he calls &lsquothe joyful ride of eating with the seasons. . . .&rsquo On page after page, McFadden presents a deliciously enlightening way of cooking with vegetables.&rdquo
    &mdashSunset

    &ldquoEnduringly rewarding. I am utterly consumed with Six Seasons and feel I could cook from it every day without tiring.&rdquo
    &mdashNigella Lawson
     
    &ldquoThis cookbook might put meat out of business. It&rsquos that good. . . . A rare source of new ideas about vegetables. McFadden&rsquos forward-looking sensibility infuses every recipe.&rdquo
    &mdashPortland Monthly
     
    &ldquoBrilliant.&rdquo
    &mdashFood52

    &ldquo[This is] a cookbook I&rsquove gotten a little obsessed with. . . . The book offers inspiring treatments for vegetables that are often relegated to a boring crudité tray&mdashif you&rsquore looking for a new way to treat celery or cabbage, you need a copy.&rdquo
    &mdashSerious Eats
     
    &ldquo Six Seasons is a beautiful book. But it&rsquos more than a pretty face: It&rsquos a practical primer that begs to come into the kitchen&mdashand won&rsquot disappoint once you get it there.&rdquo
    &mdashSanta Fe New Mexican
     
    &ldquoAn exuberant, engaging approach to vegetables. . . . Six Seasons is a joy. . . . [It] manages to feel comprehensive without sacrificing delight and humor.&rdquo
    &mdashPortland Press Herald
     
    &ldquoThe most exciting approach to home cooking I&rsquove seen all year. . . . Six Seasons is one of the most satisfying cookbooks I&rsquove purchased in years, and McFadden&rsquos insights into seasoning are invaluable, even for an experienced home cook.&rdquo
    &mdashWillamette Week
     
    &ldquoA must-have cookbook that stands out from the crowd of vegetable-centric cookbooks. . . . This cookbook deserves to become a well-thumbed, vital addition to any kitchen.&rdquo
    &mdashPublishers Weekly , starred review
     
    &ldquoEssential techniques that can help cooks become better at preparing seasonal and local vegetables. . . . Attractive vegetable recipes range from brightly colored raw and cooked salads to indulgent appetizers, pastas, and baked goods. Under McFadden&rsquos tutelage, cooks will learn how to bring out the best in every humble vegetable.&rdquo
    &mdashLibrary Journal , starred review
     
    &ldquoMcFadden&rsquos debut cookbook is an invaluable resource for all things veggie.&rdquo
    &mdash Booklist, starred review
     
    &ldquoVisionary. . . . Beautifully produced.&rdquo
    &mdash BookPage
     
    &ldquoGlorious.&rdquo
    &mdash Atlanta Journal-Constitution
     
    &ldquoThis is not a cookbook for coffee tables or artfully curated bookshelves! Its recipes demand to be tasted until the pages are dog-eared and sauce-splattered and stick together. Compulsory for the home cook.&rdquo
    &mdashDan Barber, chef/co-owner of Blue Hill
     
    &ldquoJoshua McFadden has the soul of a farmer, and his recipes are beautifully in tune with the seasons and the land.&rdquo
    &mdashAlice Waters, owner of Chez Panisse
     
    &ldquoJoshua [understands] vegetables from the perspective of both a farmer and chef. His mouthwatering and terrific solutions . . . get the most out of vegetables from their beginning to their last act on our plates.&rdquo
    &mdashDavid Chang, chef/owner of Momofuku
     
    &ldquoWe always knew Joshua was a vegetable magician, but this is so much more. We learned something new on every page. Six Seasons is a brilliant cookbook.&rdquo
    &mdashBarbara Damrosch and Eliot Coleman, cofounders of Four Season Farm

    Artisan, 9781579656317, 384pp.

    Publication Date: May 2, 2017

    About the Author

    Joshua McFadden is the founder of Submarine Hospitality in Portland, Oregon. He owns and manages Ava Gene&rsquos, Cicoria, Medjool, and Tusk restaurants. In between running the restaurants, he is bringing new life to Berny Farm, a historic fifty-acre farm in Springdale, Oregon, with the goal of creating an agricultural complex that will host collaborations between farming, food, and design. His first book,  Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables , also written with Martha Holmberg, won a James Beard Award in 2018. Follow him on Instagram at @jj_mc.

    Martha Holmberg is a food writer who co-wrote, with Joshua McFadden,  Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables&mdash a 2018 recipient of the James Beard Award. Holmberg studied cooking in Paris at École de Cuisine La Varenne and stayed to work as a private chef. She was the editor in chief of  Fine Cooking  magazine for a decade, followed by five years as the food editor of  The Oregonian  newspaper, in Portland, Oregon, where she lives. Holmberg has authored or coauthored nine books, including  The Bar Book,  with Jeffrey Morgenthaler, and her own books  Puff, Crepes, Plums,  and  Modern Sauces.  She is an avid though undisciplined tomato grower and is working on a tomato cookbook.
     


    19. "Cacio e Pepe"

    "It's a simple dish made with just three ingredients. It taught me how to cook with pasta water, pay attention to heat levels, the importance of proper ingredients (like freshly ground pepper), and the idea that sometimes the result can be much more than the sum of its parts. What a joy it was to finally make a delicious Cacio e Pepe on my eighth attempt." —u/DemmouTV